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Course Descriptions

English

Language Proficiency Index

See also Adult Basic Education (ABE) Upgrading Courses.

University Courses

The following courses are offered through the English department.

The English department offers courses required to complete VIU's Bachelor of Arts Major or Minor in English.

Some English courses are offered every year while others are offered on a rotational basis. Alternating offerings allow students to select from a wider variety of courses during their second, third, and fourth years. Information on the annual course selection and detailed descriptions of the courses may be obtained from the English department or from the Advising Centre, normally by the beginning of April.

Note: Students are not permitted to register in more than one first-year English course concurrently.

Course offerings vary from year to year. Check Generate a Timetable for available course offerings.

Students looking at options for first year English courses are advised to also consider INTR 100 and LBST 111 and 112.


ENGL 115  (3)  University Writing and Research

An introduction to critical thinking and reading, academic writing, and research skills, consistent with the conditions and expectations students encounter as readers and writers at university. Note: Students are not permitted to register in more than one first-year English course concurrently. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "C" in English 12 or equivalent.

ENGL 125  (3)  Literature and Culture

An introduction to the concept of literary genres that explores the relation between literature and its historical and cultural contexts. This course emphasizes reading, research, and writing. Note: Students are not permitted to register in more than one first-year English course concurrently. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "C" in English 12 or equivalent.

ENGL 135  (3)  Literature and Criticism

An introduction to different ways of approaching and analyzing literary works to develop awareness of the relation between literature and criticism. This course emphasizes reading, research, and writing. Note: Students are not permitted to register in more than one first-year English course concurrently. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "C" in English 12 or equivalent.

ENGL 203  (3)  Intermediate Academic Writing

An exploration of compositional technique through detailed attention to writing. The course makes use of distinctive themes and linked readings. Students write diverse short papers, discussing them in seminar and workshop formats. ENGL 203 was formerly called ENGL 215; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two first-year university English courses with a minimum grade of "C" in each course.

ENGL 204  (3)  Business and Technical Writing (Ends Dec 2013)

An introduction to business and technical communication skills with a focus on documents (such as letters and reports) and presentations. Topics may include planning, outlining, summarizing, presenting data, handling references, and editing. The course comprises several practical assignments, including a formal report and an oral presentation. ENGL 204 was formerly called ENGL 225; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: ENGL 115.

ENGL 204  (3)  Business and Technical Writing (Effective Jan 2014)

An introduction to business and technical communication skills with a focus on documents (such as letters and reports) and presentations. Topics may include planning, outlining, summarizing, presenting data, handling references, and editing. The course comprises several practical assignments, including a formal report and an oral presentation. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Any one of ENGL 115, ENGL 125, or ENGL 135.

ENGL 207  (3)  Computer-Mediated Communication

An exploration of writing and communicating on and via the internet. Students explore the nature of computer-mediated communication, learn technical skills and programs to participate in virtual learning communities, and gain practical experience constructing multimedia texts. ENGL 207 was formerly called ENGL 290; credit will not be granted for both courses. (1:0:2)

Prerequisite: One first-year university English course, with a minimum grade of "C."

ENGL 208  (3)  Introduction to Public Speaking: Communication

An introduction to public speaking that focuses on the creation, organization, and delivery of speeches for non-dramatic purposes. It provides the rhetorical principles of effective and ethical public speaking, offers opportunities to become familiar with different speaking situations, and attempts to instil a sense of the importance of public speech. ENGL 208 was formerly called THEA 203; credit will not be granted for both courses. (1:2:0)

Prerequisite: One first-year university English course with a minimum grade of "C."

ENGL 220  (3)  Canadian Literature in Context

A topical introduction to Canadian literature in a broader cultural context. The course explores distinctive elements of Canadian literature as well as characteristics shared with other cultures, historical and modern. ENGL 220 was formerly called ENGL 205 and ENGL 206; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 221  (3)  North American Indigenous Literatures

An exploration of indigenous literatures that may range from oral traditions to contemporary writings and may focus on such topics as indigenous knowledge, relationship to the land, family and community, or decolonization. ENGL 221 was formerly called ENGL 213 and ENGL 214; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 222  (3)  Travels in World Literature

A topical exploration of works of world literature not restricted by genre, period, language, or nationality. Texts not written in English will be read in translation. The course may explore cross-cultural influences from diverse origins. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 230  (3)  Literature and Popular Culture

An examination of intersections between literature and popular culture, this course will focus on examples of popular literary works such as sensation and detective fiction, graphic narrative, and the Gothic. The course will explore representative works with some historical background. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 231  (3)  Speculative Literature

An exploration of speculative literature, such as science fiction, fantasy, or utopian or dystopian writing, with some historical background. The course might explore a single speculative mode or differences and crossovers between modes. ENGL 231 was formerly called ENGL 210; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 232  (3)  Children's Literature

A topical or chronological examination of children's literature that may range from its roots in mythology, folk tale, and fable to contemporary issues such as censorship and didacticism. May cover novels, picture-books, and poetry. ENGL 232 was formerly called ENGL 261 and ENGL 262; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 233  (3)  Literature and Film

An interdisciplinary examination of literature and film. Topics may include relations between novels, comics, or scripts and cinematic adaptation; the comparative study of themes, national traditions, or theoretical concerns in both media; formal concerns and strategies; genres; or myth. ENGL 233 was formerly called ENGL 271 and ENGL 272; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters in first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 240  (3)  Ways of Reading

A topical examination of different theoretical approaches to analyzing literature familiarizes students with major critical terms and their practical application in the understanding of literature. The course emphasizes reading, research, and writing. Analytical approaches vary. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 273  (3)  Ancients and Moderns

An examination of the power of the past in the literary present. The course may focus on the shaping influence of ancient traditions on contemporary literature, on the origins of literature in religious traditions and the continuing power of myth, or on the shift from oral to written culture. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 274  (3)  Traditions and Transformations

An examination of transformations within distinct literary traditions. The course may focus on specific topics or themes or examine the representation of history in literary traditions, of literature as social criticism, or of literatures shaped by the technologies of communication and memory. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 280  (3)  Book Club

An alternative experience of literature, with some student choice in the selection of readings and a non-genre, period, or theme-based approach. This course is about taking journeys of the mind and daring to be goaded, dismayed, delighted, inspired, and moved. Why do we read? For the love of it. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Two semesters of first-year university English courses, with at least one literature course, and a minimum grade of "C" in both.

ENGL 300  (3)  Background to English Literature (Ends Aug 2014)

A study of classical and medieval European literature and main currents of thought that have helped to shape English literature from the Middle Ages to the present. May include the history of ideas, the philosophical, theological, rhetorical, and poetic backgrounds to English literature, and its literary sources and traditions. [Pre-1700 or Theory] (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 300  (3)  Backgrounds to English Literature (Effective Sep 2014)

A study of literature and main currents of thought that have helped shape English literature. Topics may include historical, philosophical, theological, rhetorical, and poetic backgrounds. Texts may focus on a specific form such as the epic, myth, fairy tale, drama, biblical narrative, and others. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 304  (3)  Advanced Professional Writing

An opportunity to build on skills introduced in ENGL 204. This course will focus on strengthening writing, editing, research, and presentation skills. Topics may include proposals, reports, writing in a digital environment, business meeting skills, evaluations and reference letters, and presentations with audio/video components. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: ENGL 204.

ENGL 310  (3)  Rhetoric (Ends Aug 2014)

This course introduces students to the Western rhetorical tradition, examining how the discipline of Rhetoric has both shaped and itself been shaped by social, political, technological, and intellectual developments. It will introduce approaches to the rhetorical analysis of communicative artifacts, acts, and events. [Theory] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 310  (3)  Topics in Rhetoric (Effective Sep 2014)

A study of rhetoric through a focus on key themes, issues, and controversies that have shaped it. This course may involve an historical approach, with an emphasis on the Western rhetorical tradition, or it may focus on contemporary rhetorical theory and practice. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 312  (3)  History of Critical Theory

A survey of the major literary critics and aestheticians from classical times to the 20th century. This course examines broad theoretical issues and underlying assumptions of various critical discourses, the changing definition of literature and criticism, and the interrelationships among politics, poetics, and philosophy. ENGL 312 was formerly called ENGL 320; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 314  (3)  Modern Critical Theory

A survey of literary theory including Russian Formalism, Structuralism, New Criticism, Marxism, Feminism, Post-Colonialism, Post-Structuralism, and others. Each theory may be examined for its assumptions, applications, and textual strategies. This course will introduce the tools of criticism and a wide range of critical dispositions. ENGL 314 was formerly called ENGL 321; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 315  (3)  Advanced Workshop in Composition

An opportunity to refine skills in writing nonfiction prose through discussion, practice, group learning, editing, and revising. Workshops include examination of the nature of the assignment, the makeup of the audience, the effectiveness of prose models, and the role of advanced language resources. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 316  (3)  Studies in Narrative (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of story-telling, including the process of narrating, the role of the narrator, and the construction of the narrative. Addresses the theoretical and cultural workings of narrative through interpreting its various forms and sub-genres. The focus may be on a specific literary movement, genre, theme, and/or critical approach.
NOTE: May be taken more than once if the focus is significantly different in each case. May meet period or other degree requirements; consult the English Chair. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 321  (3)  Literary Theory from 1900 (Ends Dec 2013)

A survey of the range of literary theory: Russian Formalism, Structuralism, New Criticism, Marxism, Feminism, Post-Colonialism, Post-Structuralism, and beyond. Each theory is examined for its assumptions, applications, and textual strategies. [Theory or 20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 325  (3)  Topics in Environmental Literature

A study of various genres examining the relationship of writers to their environment. Content may vary from a survey of broad environmental concepts, such as representations of the wilderness or conservation initiatives, to a focus on precise landscapes. ENGL 325 was formerly called ENGL 403; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 326  (3)  Topics in Globalization and Culture

A study of literary and cultural responses to globalization. Content may vary from broad issues, such as human rights, multiculturalism, diasporas, and economics, to specific topics, such as food production, terrorism, urbanism, and censorship. ENGL 326 was formerly called ENGL 407; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 327  (3)  Topics in International Literature

A study of international literature in context. Content may vary from broad concepts, such as global citizenship, national identity, and diaspora to a focus on a specific region, culture, or genre. The course may take a comparative literature approach. Texts not written in English will be read in translation. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 328  (3)  Gender and Sexuality in Literature

A study of the representation of gender, sexual identities, and/or practices in literature. Topics may include gender and agency, LGBT narratives, pomosexualities, parenting and the changing face of families, and others. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 329  (3)  Topics in Children's and Young Adult Literature

A study of texts written primarily for children and young adults. Topics may include picturebooks, fairy tales, the child in nature, the changing constructions of childhood/adolescence, censorship, crossover literature, and others. ENGL 329 was formerly called ENGL 435; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 330  (3)  Topics in Speculative Narrative

A study of narrative through speculative fiction, which may include fantasy, science fiction, steampunk, cyberpunk, scientific romance, and alternate worlds. Genres may include short fiction, novels, poetry, graphic narratives, television, and film. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 331  (3)  Topics in West Coast Literature

An examination of the literature of British Columbia and the West Coast of North America. Topics may include orality, fusion literatures, Indigenous literatures, exploration and travel, settlement and expansionism, environmentalism, regionalism, politics, culture, identity, and others. ENGL 331 was formerly called ENGL 402; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 332  (3)  Topics in Indigenous Literatures

A study of Indigenous cultures, identities, and issues through literature. Genres may include fiction, poetry, drama, film, and oral narratives. Topics may include cultural practices, historical contexts, regional issues, and others. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 333  (3)  Topics in Post-Colonial Literatures

An introduction to post-colonial literatures and theories. Topics may include colonization, decolonization, diaspora, ethnicity, migration, ecological imperialism, the politics of language, the relationship between orality and literacy, and others. ENGL 333 was formerly called ENGL 406; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 334  (3)  Topics in Canadian Literature

A study of Canadian literature focused on a specific author or topic. Topics may include regionalism, urbanism, landscapes, geographies, eco-poetics, transnationalism, and others. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 335  (3)  Survey of Canadian Literature

A broad historical survey of Canadian fiction, drama, and/or poetry. This course will include an examination of cultural and theoretical contexts. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 340  (3)  Medieval English Literature (Ends Aug 2014)

A study of medieval literature within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. May include Chaucer, the Pearl-poet, Langland, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, and others. [Pre-1700] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 340  (3)  Topics in Medieval Literature (Effective Sep 2014)

A study of medieval literature within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. Topics may include chivalry, courtly love, Arthurian tradition, mysticism, allegory, alchemy, theology, and others. The focus may be on a single author or genre. ENGL 340 was formerly called ENGL 340; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 341  (3)  Chaucer (Ends May 2014)

A study of Chaucer's: The Canterbury Tales. The course may include some of Chaucer's other works for context or comparison. [Pre-1700] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 342  (3)  Topics in Renaissance Literature

A study of 16th-century literature within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. Topics may include lyrical poetry, drama, courtly love, humanism, utopian literature, and others. Focus may be on a single author or genre. ENGL 342 was formerly called ENGL 359; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 344  (3)  Topics in Shakespeare

A study of the works of Shakespeare. The course may focus on various representations of particular Shakespearean plays or on a variety of Shakespeare's works. Topics may include performance, the London Stage, film adaptations, transformations of identity and power, public freedom, and others. ENGL 344 was formerly called ENGL 367; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 346  (3)  Topics in 17th-Century Literature

A study of 17th-century literature within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. Genres may include poetry, prose, non-Shakespearean drama, and others. The focus may be on a single author, theme, or genre. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 348  (3)  Topics in 18th-Century Literature

A study of 18th-century literature within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. Topics may include neo-classicism, satire, the novel, the gothic, abolitionist literature, the Revolutionary period, Romanticism, and others. The focus may be on a single author or genre. ENGL 348 was formerly called ENGL 378; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 350  (3)  Topics in 19th-Century Literature

A study of 19th-century literature within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. Topics may include Romanticism, American Renaissance, medievalism, the gothic and neo-gothic, fin de siècle, scientific romance, and others. The focus may be on a single author or genre. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 352  (3)  Topics in 20th- and 21st-Century Literature

A study of 20th- and 21st-century literature and its contexts. Topics may include narrative and nation, dystopias, transculturalism, modernism, Celtic Renaissance, human rights, cultures of resistance, and others. Focus may be on a specific author, genre, theme, or region. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 359  (3)  Renaissance Literature (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of the major non-dramatic literature of the 16th century within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. May include Spenser, Sidney, More, Bacon, and others. [Pre-1700] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 367  (3)  Topics in Shakespeare (Ends Apr 2014)

The particular works and focus of this course will vary from semester to semester. Some possibilities are Politics and Shakespeare, Feminist Approaches to Shakespeare, Shakespeare's non-dramatic poetry, or Hamlet's Critical Reception. Students wishing to use this course to meet a period requirement of the English Major or Minor should consult with Dept. Chair. [Pre-1700] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 382  (3)  Romantic Literature (Ends Apr 2014)

A study of British Romanticism, including its late 18th century backgrounds, within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. May include Burns, Blake, the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, Keats, Clare, Wollstonecraft, Austen, and others. [1700-1900] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 384  (3)  Victorian Literature (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of the major literature of the period within the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the age. May include the Brontes, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Rossettis, Ruskin, Carlyle, Eliot, Dickens, Hardy, and others. [1700-1900] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 390  (3)  Topics in Word and Image

A study of the relationship between words and images within literary texts. Topics may include graphic narratives, comic books, manga, picturebooks, illustrated fiction and poetry, illuminated manuscripts, photographs, and other image-based approaches. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 392  (3)  Topics in Digital Humanities

An introduction to and overview of the digital humanities focused on technology and its link to literature. Topics may include software applications, digitizing texts, Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), digital textual analysis, the concept of the digital edition, implications of digital transmission, and others. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 394  (3)  Topics in Television Narrative

A study of narrative developed for television. Discussion may involve analysis of genre, plot, characters, themes, symbolism, and ideologies. The course may focus on one particular genre, series, or creator or on a particular theme or topic as illustrated through a variety of television productions. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 396  (3)  Literature and Film

A study of the interrelationships between literature and film. Focus may be on a particular author, director, genre, theme, or region. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 398  (3)  Film Studies

A study of narrative developed for film. Discussion may involve analysis of genre, plot, characters, themes, symbolism, cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing, sound, acting, and ideologies. The course may be structured as a broad survey or with a focus on a single director or theme. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: 6 credits of 200-level literature from the English department or permission of instructor.

ENGL 403  (3)  Environmental Literature (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of various genres examining the relationship of writers to their natural environment. The focus is cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary. Imaginative literature forms the main study, but political, social and scientific issues may be discussed. [20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 406  (3)  Studies in Post-Colonial Literatures (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of the literatures of post-colonial societies. May include discussion of the relationship between orality and literacy and themes such as colonialization, decolonization, multiculturism, and the politics of language. May be taken for credit more than once provided course content differs significantly. [Multicultural or 20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 408  (3)  Advanced Public Speaking: Communication

A continuation of ENGL 208 that focuses on the civic nature of public speaking. Topics include more advanced speech topics and incorporation of appropriate technologies. Emphasis is placed on the practice of effective listening, the analysis of speeches, and the uses of persuasion and audience analysis to deliver professional presentations to different audiences. (1:2:0)

Prerequisite: ENGL 208; or THEA 203 or THEA 108 and third-year standing.

ENGL 414  (3)  Modern and Contemporary World Drama (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of drama from the beginnings of dramatic realism in the mid-nineteenth century, including an exploration of non-traditional forms of contemporary international theatre and performance. [20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 415  (3)  Studies in Comparative Literature (Ends Apr 2014)

A study within the discipline of Comparative Literature. May include tracing movements or ideas across national literatures, different artistic forms (literature and painting, music, etc.) or other spheres of human activity (literature and psychology, law, science, etc.) (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 416  (3)  Studies in a Major Author, School or Movement (Ends Apr 2014)

A study of a major author, literary school, or movement. May include an exploration of historical, biographical, and cultural contexts, as well as their influence on subsequent literary trends and figures.
NOTE: May be taken more than once if the focus is significantly different in each case. May meet period or other degree requirements; consult the English Chair. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 425  (3)  Teaching Writing: Theory and Practice

A survey of key theories in composition with a view to their pedagogical application. Topics include assessing and evaluating writing, contemporary rhetoric, the socio-cultural context of writing, and an exploration of writing-in-the disciplines programs. Four weeks as peer tutors in the Writing Centre will provide students with experiential learning. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing, ENGL 215, and one of ENGL 310 or ENGL 315.

ENGL 430  (3)  American Literature to 1900 (Ends Apr 2014)

A study of American literature to the 20th Century. May include an examination of historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. [1700-1900] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 433  (3)  Studies in a National Literature (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of a national literature (such as Irish, Australian, Polish etc.) within some of the broader social, political, philosophical, and cultural contexts of that nation. May include a literature in translation. May be taken for multiple credit if the focus is sufficiently different in each case. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 435  (3)  Children's Literature (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of texts written primarily for children/adolescents. May include an examination of text production, presentation, the changing views/constructions of childhood/adolescence, as well as those of censorship, selection, and audience. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 436  (3)  British Literature from 1900 to 1945 (Ends Apr 2014)

A study of the works of British authors of the first part of the Twentieth Century. May include an examination of historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. [20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 450  (3)  Canadian Fiction (Ends Dec 2013)

A study of Canadian fiction primarily of the 20th and 21st Centuries. May include an examination of historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. [Canadian or 20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 452  (3)  Canadian Poetry (Ends Apr 2014)

A study of Canadian poetry primarily of the 20th and 21st Centuries. May include an examination of historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. [Canadian or 20th Century] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 480  (3)  Research Methods

An opportunity to enhance research skills and explore a variety of literary critical approaches. May include language and rhetorical concerns, research problems, scholarly apparatus for longer projects, and formal presentations. [Theory] (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. 6 credits of 200-level English courses or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 490  (3)  Special Project

An independent project that usually takes the form of a supervised extended essay. It may take other forms such as film, CD-ROM, etc. Enrolment is by approval of the English Chair only. Students normally make arrangements for 490 in the Spring semester of third year. For information consult the English Chair. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. average of "B" in the 15 most recent credits of English or permission of the English Chair.