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Applying to Transfer

Definitions


University and Career/Technical Programs

Programs listed at viu.ca/pal/academic

Transfer Student

A student applying to VIU who has
(a) completed at least 24 transferable credits from a post- secondary institution other than VIU
(b) completed some, but less than24, transferable credits from a post- secondary institution other than VIU and has graduated from high school with at least a “C” in English 12
(c) where required, has completed a diploma in a specific discipline as outlined in the admission requirements e.g. Bachelor of Music in Jazz Studies

Assigned Credit

Credit granted for a course that is assessed as equivalent to a specific course or a combination of courses at VIU E.G.

Unassigned Discipline-specific Credit

Credit granted for a course that is assessed as having comparable subject matter that falls under the discipline but a specific course equivalency that is not available at VIU. This credit may be used as a prerequisite for a higher level class in the same discipline with instructor approval E.G.

Unassigned General Faculty Credit

Credit granted for a course that is assessed as having subject matter at an equivalent level in a discipline not taught at VIU E.G.

Block Transfer

Block Transfer occurs when a group of courses, often in the form of a certificate, diploma or associate degree, is recognized as a whole for transfer credit.  (http://www.bctransferguide.ca/block/)
VIU Policy E.G.

Degree Advisor

Sometimes called Program Advisors at other institutions, Degree Advisors have expertise pertaining to specific degree programs at VIU. They can answer questions on a multitude of degree specific subjects such as:

  • majors and minors;
  • declaring;
  • degree mapping and completion;
  • and unique enrichment opportunities like research, study abroad, internships, leadership, & student development.
List of Degree Advisors.

Transfer Credit

Credit applied to a student record recognizing previously acquired knowledge, training or expertise undertaken at another institution.

Course Outline

Also known as a syllabus, a course outline is a document provided by a department and/or professor/instructor to a student within a course containing all pertinent information for completion of the course – it is the plan for the class. This generally includes:

  • a course description;
  • contact information for the professor/instructor;
  • standard policy statements;
  • topics, learning objectives, and  outcomes for the course;
  • instructional method and schedule;
  • course materials and resources;
  • assignments;
  • and evaluation procedures.

*NOTE: This is not to be confused with a course calendar descriptions which is often a single paragraph description.
EXAMPLE

Curriculum

  • The specific learning outcomes identified within a course
  • The umbrella of identified learning outcomes, engagement, materials, resources, and opportunities that encompass a program and/or an academic credential.

Official Transcript

An original, sealed copy of a student’s permanent academic record bearing the signature of the Registrar and printed on official transcript paper.

Sending Institution

The institution that you are transferring credit from e.g. the institution that you received your diploma at that you would like credit for towards continuing on in a degree program

Receiving Institution

The institution that you are transferring credit into e.g. the institution that you would like to apply your diploma credits to in order to continue on in a degree program e.g. VIU

Advanced Standing

When a student is admitted at a higher level than first year. E.g. granted 3rd year standing; this means that you are grouped in the same pool of students that are also in their 3rd year at VIU. To be considered as a 3rd year student, you must complete a minimum of 54 academic credits.

Syllabus

Also known as a course outline, a syllabus is a document provided by a department and/or professor/instructor to a student within a course containing all pertinent information for completion of the course – it is the plan for the class. This generally includes:

  • a course description;
  • contact information for the professor/instructor;
  • standard policy statements;
  • topics, learning objectives, and  outcomes for the course;
  • instructional method and schedule;
  • course materials and resources;
  • assignments;
  • and evaluation procedures.

*NOTE: This is not to be confused with a course calendar descriptions which is often a single paragraph description.

  • EXAMPLE

Articulated Credit

Courses that have previously gone through the assessment process and have been articulated under one of two categories: Assigned Credit or Unassigned Credit. (Unassigned credit can be program specific or general academic credit.)

To-be-articulated Credit

Course that have not yet been through the assessment process for articulation. More info on the process can be found here.